Translation Commissions [STICKY]

If you’d like me to translate something from Japanese into English for you, you’ve come to the right place. I’m Kim Morrissy (AKA Frog-kun), a Japanese studies major who specialises in literary translation. See here for a list of things I’ve translated online.

I charge a small fee for private translation commissions. Don’t worry, it’s not much – just 2 Australian cents per Japanese character. See the full post for all the details!

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Vague Thoughts on Winter 2017 Anime

hand_shakers_boobs

The longer I keep up with seasonal anime, the more evident it becomes that most anime are vehicles of stealth marketing. You can watch anime-original projects full of SAKUGA like the above, but most shows are 350-minute long advertisements of a manga/novel/game/whatever. Why bother sticking to just anime for your weeb entertainment in today’s media mix environment?

These days, I usually go directly to the source material unless I really like the anime staff. There are very few anime that fall into this category this season, unfortunately. I would have liked to watch Little Witch Academia, but unfortunately there’s no legal streaming option outside of Japanese Netflix. And as much as I like Yasuhiro Takemoto and KyoAni shows in general, Maid Dragon Kobayashi isn’t my kind of thing.

But whatever, I’ve still been getting into some interesting stuff this season, so here are some vague impressions.

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“My Little Sister Can Read Kanji” vs “I Saved Too Many Girls and Caused the Apocalypse”

j-novel-covers

Light novels are known for their clickbait titles even though the majority of light novels do not actually have clickbait titles. But hey, I fell for it, because out of all the J-Novel Club titles released so far, the only ones I’ve read at the time of this writing are My Little Sister Can Read Kanji and I Saved Too Many Girls and Caused the Apocalypse. I regret nothing.

This blog post is an evaluation of the two titles and their potential for fantastic memes.

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The Isolator is Reki Kawahara’s Best Work

isolator

Reki Kawahara is well known for Sword Art Online and Accel World, but if you ask me, his best work is The Isolator, a sci-fi thriller and psychological drama series that only gets a new volume once a year. It’s based off a web novel Kawahara began writing in 2004, but he has rewritten the story heavily for its light novel release, and it is easily his most mature work.

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Reflections on 2016: Thank You for Everything

 

squid-girl-christmas

Source: The Squid Girl author’s twitter

Let’s recap the 12 Days of Anime and the whirlwind year that was 2016.

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Reflections on 2016: Making Friends with the Anime Feminists

emilia

In October 2016, a friend of mine launched a website called Anime Feminist. I’m really surprised at how well it’s been doing so far. Although I’m not actively involved with creating content, I’m close enough to the action to see just how hard the staff has been working to keep things going. It’s been a real privilege to see the results of their work, and I hope that the site meets all its funding goals in 2017.

I’ve already talked about my motives for supporting Anime Feminist elsewhere, but I do want to talk for a bit about how I first became friends with the site’s editor-in-chief, Amelia Cook. Looking back, it was a rather unlikely friendship….

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Reflections on 2016: NOT HAVING TIME FOR ANYTHING

k-on-dizzy

Today’s post will be short because as the title subtly implies, I’m somewhat pressed for time.

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Reflections on 2016: Anime is Political

yuri-on-ice

2016 has been a crazy year in world politics, to put it lightly. Anti-globalist sentiments and nativism aren’t anything new in the scheme of things, but they were big factors behind some of the major political decisions of this year. Yet in spite of all the heightened anxiety about immigration and foreign trade, globalisation continues to truck on with no sign of stopping.

The anime industry is becoming more international. In 2016, we got a US-Japan anime collaboration in the form of the SHELTER music video, and we also got to see Kimi no Na wa break records around the worldAnd these are just the most obvious things that happened this year. These days, more and more foreigners are working in Japan’s anime industry (see: Thomas Romain’s cool website for aspiring French animators), and online streaming is getting bigger around the world. It’s never been a more exciting time to be an international anime fan.

Sure, the world might be fucked in the long term, but at least I’ll be watching good anime until the apocalypse…

Right?

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Reflections on 2016: My Taste Has Changed

I don’t know what I’m looking for when I watch anime. Do I want something with good animation? Do I want something to relax to? Do I want a thrilling story? I don’t know. I don’t have any specific preferences.

Because of that, I can’t really explain my anime taste to anyone. I joke a lot about liking harems and light novel adaptations and whatnot, but when it comes to my absolute favourites, I don’t know how to describe them. Maybe it’s because they don’t fit easily into a single genre, or perhaps it’s because I can’t think of a particular reason for why they’ve captured my heart.

code-geass

I’m looking at you, Code Geass…

Despite not being able to describe my tastes, however, I am certain of one thing: my taste has changed over the years.

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Reflections on 2016: Mixing Anime and Reality

politics-anime2016 was the year anime and reality started to mix.

Until this year, I had been careful to keep my online identity (and, by extension, my anime fandom) separate from my real life. This was mostly for privacy reasons, although if I have to honest, it was also because I’m more confident expressing myself through writing than through speaking. I still don’t put pictures of myself online, and that’s probably for the best.

Eventually, however, I ended up identifying under my real name for Anime News Network and Crunchyroll, and I’ve met several internet friends in person throughout the year. The result? Nothing really changed. On hindsight, I realise that there was never a clear separation between “reality” and “online” in the first place.

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Reflections on 2016: Writing for Crunchyroll

crunchyroll-frog

If you’d told me just a few months ago that I’d end up writing for Crunchyroll, I would have laughed in your face. Even now, I still don’t know what I did to deserve it.

This isn’t false modesty speaking. I do have concerns, not with Crunchyroll itself, but with the platform and privilege I have been given. While the editorial team proofreads my articles and offers me feedback, I don’t get fact checked. If I spread inaccurate information through my articles, it would be entirely my own fault. It would be one thing to talk out of my ass on my blog, which I frequently do, but on Crunchyroll, where tens of thousands of people read my articles, the consequences are more serious.

I’m not sure whether the other writers experience this feeling, but for me, it’s been a pressure since day one.

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