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Manga vs Anime – The Art and Animation in Fuuka

Note: Ah yes, this article. Maybe it’s not good to say, but originally I was gonna be much more negative because the Fuuka anime is about on the same level as pig’s excretion. Naturally, I wasn’t allowed to say that on the site this anime is streaming on. Have fun reading this article and identifying all the euphemisms for “this is shit”.

Anyway, this is a repost of a series of an article I originally wrote for Crunchyroll. Check my writer profile to see my latest articles.


Watching the first episode of the Fuuka anime made me realize how good the manga is at what it does. Fuuka is very much a typical teenage romance manga, complete with tsundere antics and a panty shot in the opening pages, but there’s also something irresistibly readable about it. In large part, this is due to the manga’s visual execution. Kouji Seo may be a controversial manga artist because of the often frustrating relationships he depicts in his stories, but he also knows how to capture a teenage boy’s viewpoint through his art. In the Fuuka manga, our hero’s confidence issues seep through his body language in every panel.

fuuka manga

Watching the anime, however, has been quite a different experience so far. The first thing I noticed about it was its overall aesthetic. The colors clash with each other, and the 3D backgrounds have an oddly prosthetic and clinical look about them that doesn’t mesh well with the character animation. The production flaws are understandable, considering that the anime’s art director and color coordinator are both first-timers in these roles. Studio Diomedéa has also struggled to finish major projects on time lately, particularly the recent KanColle movie, and Fuuka was almost certainly a victim of a rushed schedule (sadly the norm for TV anime). The external factors were clearly not in the anime’s favor.

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What’s It Like To Be A Voice Actor?

voice-over-actorI recently read Tara Platt and Yuri Lowenthal’s guide on how to become a voice actor. Their book, called Voice-Over Voice Actor: What It’s Like Behind the Mic, was first published in 2009, but their observations about the North American voice-over industry should still be valid today. Here’s the part I found most relevant to my interests as a fan of English dubbed anime:

Here’s generally how [English dubbing] works: you’re in the booth (sitting or standing), and in front of you is a monitor on which the engineer will play the animation for you. Your script is on a music stand in front of you. Usually your dialogue is broken down into bite-sized pieces called loops. You may watch a lop a couple of times to get a feel for both the timing and what the mouth movements (or flaps) look like before laying down the dub track.

Oftentimes the director has the engineer play the track in the original language so that you get some context from the original performance. How close you try to get to the original performance is up to the director. This process definitely takes some getting used to, and can, at times, be like juggling a ball, a bowling pin, and a chainsaw. But you will usually have your guide: the beeps.

Immediately preceding the moment when you need to begin speaking, you hear (in your headphones) The Three Beeps. These beeps are timed so that you begin speaking on the beat where the imaginary fourth beep would fall. So: beep… beep… beep… speak! (pp. 35-6)

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Everything You Need to Know about Qualidea Code

1468033439_2_4_4bdcd55acfeee6cd3d711c6dfc8e79f8The Qualidea Code anime started airing today! …leaving audiences around the world very confused. Thus, I have prepared a handy FAQ to explain what the heck is going on and how this series was conceived.

[NOTE: This guide uses Japanese order for names: family name first, given name last.]

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