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Blog Archives

The Important Takeaways from the J-Novel AMA on Reddit

arifureta

On February 18th, Sam Pinansky of J-Novel Club hosted an AMA on r/LightNovels, where he answered user questions and announced J-Novel Club’s latest license: Arifureta: From Commonplace to World’s Strongest. I found this very interesting, given that I was one of the people who had requested Arifureta on the forums, and I had also predicted that it would get licensed last year.

Overall, there was nothing in the AMA that surprised me as someone who has been following J-Novel Club since its inception, but I thought it would be interesting to share some of the answers in the thread to my readers. I also thought it would be useful to archive this information in a more easily accessible form. Think of it as a status update for the company.

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My Predictions for J-Novel Club

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Last month, a new English light novel distributor emerged on the scene. Called J-Novel Club, it promises to publish the latest light novels worldwide in digital format. You might have seen my interview with the site’s owner on Crunchyroll, which goes into more detail about what the site is all about and what sort of titles are available there already.

Needless to say, I’m a supporter of the website. It’s a risky and experimental venture, but I definitely want it to succeed. If J-Novel Club manages to take off, we could see more light novels available in English, including the more obscure titles without anime adaptations. I never thought the day would come when I’d be able to read an official English translation of My Little Sister Can Read Kanji, but now that it has arrived, I fall on my knees and thank God I’m alive.

So what’s next in the world of English light novels? While I have no way of seeing the future, I do have some tentative predictions about the prospects of J-Novel Club, which I’d like to share in this post.

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What’s the appeal of those “stuck in another world” fantasies? Some Japanese bloggers explain

re-zero-kara-hajimeru-isekai-seikatsu-episode-1-04-45_2016-04-03_22-50-21During my adventures on the Japanese web, I rarely see people say anything good about the recent trend towards isekai (“stuck in another world”) stories, particularly in light novels and web novels. The stories are frequently dismissed as shallow, masturbatory and full of cheap wish fulfillment. It’s overdone, they say. It’s trite and cliche. Stop adapting so many of these stories into anime.

Japanese readers have even come up with memes to make fun of the recent trends. 「俺TUEEEE」(“I’m so stroooooong”) basically means “Overpowered MC”. When a story is filled to the brim with all the various wish fulfillment tropes, it’s referred to as a narou-type work. Narou comes from Shousetsuka ni Narou! (“Let’s become a novelist!”), which is far and away the most popular website for posting amateur web novels. If you check out the top-ranked series, the vast majority are isekai stories where the MC does pretty much nothing to earn his 俺TUEEEE status.

The Japanese fandom is like the English fandom in the sense that the majority of internet commentary about this trend is snarky and negative, but a significant number of people are hooked on these stories nevertheless. There are plenty of netizens who attempt to explain the appeal of the narou genre, but because they’re clearly disdainful of it, their explanations occasionally seem condescending, even pathologising (e.g. “it’s a shallow power fantasy aimed at nerds who will never find a girlfriend!”) Nevertheless, there are bloggers who articulate why they like the narou genre quite thoughtfully, so I thought I’d focus on their perspectives in this post.

Because I cannot accept their points at face value, I’m going to respond to them critically in this post. However, I invite you to come to your own conclusions.

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A Discussion about Ecchi, Lolicon and Politics with the Owner of Fapservice.com

f6mxRvrFapservice.com is an NSFW website that highlights the ecchi fanservice scenes in anime and manga. If you’re an ecchi lover, you probably know about the site already! It’s a great resource if you want to get your ecchi fix without having to watch an entire series.

I recently sat down with wizardofecchi, the owner of the website, to discuss his philosophy about ecchi and otaku sexuality. We also talk about the stigma that lovers of 2D characters face, as well as what is probably the most controversial issue in the fandom today: lolicon.

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Welcome to Frogkun.com!

Hey guys, welcome to the new url for my blog. Before we get down to business, let’s have a moment of silence for my old site domain. You have served us well, fantasticmemes.wordpress.com. I will never forget the good times I had with you. Dare I say that it was fantastic?

cry everytiem

i cry everytiem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But alas, fantasticmemes.wordpress.com, your time has passed, and now I’ve moved on to greener domains.

Although this blog is still called Fantastic Memes for the time being, I have long been aware that I don’t actually write about internet memes very much. That’s why I named the new url after my internet handle, because it gives me the leeway to change the blog name in future to something more reflective of what I actually do around here. But for now, I’m still attached to Fantastic Memes, and I’m sure you are too.

I paid for the new site domain with the profits I’ve made from the translation/reviewing commission service I opened earlier this month. So thank you to everyone who made use of my services! Of course, even if you didn’t ask for a commission, I’m really grateful for your continued readership. My hope is that I can provide even better updates and services in the future. I also want to start using some of the money I earn to support other artists whose work I admire greatly.

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