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Merry Christmas!

Source: Konachan

Source: Konachan

It’s been an exhausting twelve days furiously scrambling together posts for the annual 12 Days of Anime, but we’ve finally reached the end of the line – at least in Down Under. Today’s post is not about anime, however. I want to sincerely wish you all a Merry Christmas and I hope you have a great New Year!

One thing that struck me while I was covering these anime Christmas episodes/features was how vastly different each anime handled the Christmas theme. Part of this is due to self-selection, but it’s also a reflection of how Christmas doesn’t have the same cultural significance in Japan as it does elsewhere. It’s fascinating to see how anime reinterprets Christmas motifs and themes. Like a lot of anime in general, it manages to feel simultaneously familiar and exotic.

Although I was brought up Catholic, I’m no stickler for purism, nor am I overly concerned with “THE TRUE MEANING OF CHRISTMAS”. I’m just happy that people across the world can enjoy Christmas in their own ways. So regardless of your religious beliefs, I hope that this year’s Christmas will be a special day for you to remember. Take care, everyone, and I’ll see you again at the New Year!

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Posted on December 24, 2014, in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 33 Comments.

  1. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you as well, Frog-kun! Thanks for sharing your thoughts and insights with us. Best wishes for another year of profound/silly blogging glory.

  2. And a very Merry Christmas to you as well. I like your blog very much.

    On the topic of christmas in anime, and possibly Japan in general, it’s a weird thing. It’s so different from my family’s own traditions, yet it somehow feels right. Where I come from, Christmas Eve is naturally a day of celebration, but in a solemn sort of way. In the morning we go to the cemetery and leave candles on our ancestors’ graves, and then we visit relatives. In the evening we have dinner with my grandparents(and occasionally with other, more distant relatives) and read from the Nativity of Jesus. Very few of my family members are religious, or even christian, but it’s tradition.

    Christmas in Japan seems like a completely different world compared to that, but from what I’ve seen and heard, it’s still a day of celebration(in a way). Maybe that’s enough. If it was a day of aggressive politics or ideology, I might be weirded out, but that doesn’t seem to be the case.

    In the end, though, I don’t think our cultures are that different. All the traditional ceremonies that I mentioned are probably performed in almost every culture, but during different times of year. Obon, for instance, covers the grave-visiting part of my local traditions.

    I guess what I’m trying to say is that no matter how we all celebrate Christmas, maybe we’re not so different after all. To quote from the traditional Finnish “Declaration of Christmas Peace”:

    “Tomorrow, God willing, is the graceful celebration of the birth of our Lord and Saviour; and thus is declared a peaceful Christmas time to all”

  3. Well merry Christmas and a Happy Ney Year to you too Mr. Frog.

  4. Merry Christmas, Froggy! Thanks for all the bizarre posts and discussions about asian cartoons! They’ve certainly been an experience

  5. Merry Christmas Froggy! (OMG HONOKA-CHAN!!!!)

  6. Take care of yourself dood. Happy holidays and hope you got lots of lolis or waifus in your stocking.

  7. Merry Christmas, too, Froggy! Thanks for your wonderful posts (though I’m too lost for words to actually comment on them). Anyway, I just want you to know that I truly enjoy reading your posts (but I’m sure you already know how appreciated you and your posts are).

  8. A Very Merry Christmas to you, Froggy! May your Christmas Day be blessed with the choir songs of kawaii imoutos and chocolate flies.

    On a more serious note, it’s always interesting to see different traditions of celebration. My family kind of does Christmas (we have a tree and presents) but for us, it’s more about honoring the winter solstice, which also happens around the same time and emphasizes family reunion and the balance of light and dark shifting towards positive energy restoration. It’s also really an excuse to make a ton of food.

    • Thanks for the wellwishes! I didn’t get any chocolate flies, but someone did email me this:

      On another note, thanks for sharing about your own family traditions. Any excuse to make a ton of food is a good one, it seems ;) Hope you had a great Christmas yourself!

  9. Merry Christmas to Senor Frog-kun! Hope you have a great day!

  10. Merry Christmas to you too! :3

  11. Merry Christmas! I’m stuck working today as per normal – Christmas doesn’t mean all that much here so it’s not a holiday of any kind – but I opened a couple of presents this morning that my family sent over, and I’ll be skyping them tonight, so I’m happy enough.

  12. Merry Christmas to you too, Sir! :-)
    I think you’re doing a great job as a blogger and I also really enjoy your Oregairu translations, keep up your hard work and my heart is your’s ;-)
    In advance: Happy New Year!

    • Thank you for the well wishes! Hope you had a great day yourself!

      Speaking of the Oregairu translation, I should probably finish the edits for the drama CD and update the site. Expect something over the next couple of days :)

  13. Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to you, Frog-kun.

  14. Merry Christmas to you, Frog-kun!

  15. Merry Christmas^^ How do frogs celebrate Christmas again?

  16. Merry Christmas, Frog!!!
    Having just returned from a Tokyo holiday myself, I can say that even though Japan doesn’t get a holiday; at least they’re upholding the festive spirit!!! The Christmas illuminations were especially wonderful.

    Here’s to more excellent posts for next year!!

  17. Merry Christmas!
    Also I really recommend picking up Yuuki yuuna wa Yuusha de aru. It’s a gem. Just try watching one more episode and you’ll see what I’m getting onto.

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