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Blog Archives

“My Little Sister Can Read Kanji” vs “I Saved Too Many Girls and Caused the Apocalypse”

j-novel-covers

Light novels are known for their clickbait titles even though the majority of light novels do not actually have clickbait titles. But hey, I fell for it, because out of all the J-Novel Club titles released so far, the only ones I’ve read at the time of this writing are My Little Sister Can Read Kanji and I Saved Too Many Girls and Caused the Apocalypse. I regret nothing.

This blog post is an evaluation of the two titles and their potential for fantastic memes.

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The Isolator is Reki Kawahara’s Best Work

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Reki Kawahara is well known for Sword Art Online and Accel World, but if you ask me, his best work is The Isolator, a sci-fi thriller and psychological drama series that only gets a new volume once a year. It’s based off a web novel Kawahara began writing in 2004, but he has rewritten the story heavily for its light novel release, and it is easily his most mature work.

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Reflections on 2016: How I Became “The Light Novel Blogger”

2016 was the year I finished writing my honours thesis and graduated from university. The thesis, which drew heavily from my personal observations as a light novel fan translator, was called “Exploring Foreignisation/Domestication Post-Editing Strategies in Machine-Assisted Fan Translations of Japanese Web Novels” (what a mouthful!). Later this year, I published two articles based on my research on Anime News Network, explaining the basics of the subculture.

And now, for some inexplicable reason that I can’t quite fathom, I’m known to the fandom at large as… “the light novel blogger”.

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October 2016 Update: Why I Support Anime Feminist, And More

love-live-halloweenIt’s the spooky Halloween edition!

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Thoughts on Hakomari

covers2-3I still don’t know what happened there…

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Re:ZERO Ex vol. 1 – Summary and Impressions

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In a nutshell: The Re:ZERO Ex novel raises more questions than it answers about Crusch and Ferris’s pasts, but Re:ZERO fans should enjoy it nonetheless. The lack of a central plot in this volume does make it weaker than the main story, however.

A note of warning: This review contains spoilers for the Re:ZERO Ex novel. In fact, I wrote this blog post for the express purpose of spoiling it because it hasn’t been translated yet. Don’t read this post if you don’t want to get spoiled for the anime because I’ll be discussing the main story here as well. Also, there are no web novel spoilers here, so please don’t provide any in the comments.

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I bought this light novel thinking it was a cute knight/princess story but it was a gay romance instead

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Actual title: 12-gatsu no Veronica (Amazon link)

Hey guys, I’m back with another review of an untranslated light novel that nobody has read or will ever read. But I liked it, so here’s a blog post about it. I will be spoiling the crap out of the entire novel, so here’s a fair warning in advance. I have a lot of ~FEELINGS~ to convey, so let’s jump right into it.

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What’s the appeal of those “stuck in another world” fantasies? Some Japanese bloggers explain

re-zero-kara-hajimeru-isekai-seikatsu-episode-1-04-45_2016-04-03_22-50-21During my adventures on the Japanese web, I rarely see people say anything good about the recent trend towards isekai (“stuck in another world”) stories, particularly in light novels and web novels. The stories are frequently dismissed as shallow, masturbatory and full of cheap wish fulfillment. It’s overdone, they say. It’s trite and cliche. Stop adapting so many of these stories into anime.

Japanese readers have even come up with memes to make fun of the recent trends. 「俺TUEEEE」(“I’m so stroooooong”) basically means “Overpowered MC”. When a story is filled to the brim with all the various wish fulfillment tropes, it’s referred to as a narou-type work. Narou comes from Shousetsuka ni Narou! (“Let’s become a novelist!”), which is far and away the most popular website for posting amateur web novels. If you check out the top-ranked series, the vast majority are isekai stories where the MC does pretty much nothing to earn his 俺TUEEEE status.

The Japanese fandom is like the English fandom in the sense that the majority of internet commentary about this trend is snarky and negative, but a significant number of people are hooked on these stories nevertheless. There are plenty of netizens who attempt to explain the appeal of the narou genre, but because they’re clearly disdainful of it, their explanations occasionally seem condescending, even pathologising (e.g. “it’s a shallow power fantasy aimed at nerds who will never find a girlfriend!”) Nevertheless, there are bloggers who articulate why they like the narou genre quite thoughtfully, so I thought I’d focus on their perspectives in this post.

Because I cannot accept their points at face value, I’m going to respond to them critically in this post. However, I invite you to come to your own conclusions.

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Getting into Light Novels for Girls

Source: Tumblr

Source: Tumblr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of you may be surprised that there’s such a thing as light novels for girls, but yes, they do exist. In fact, they’re a dime a dozen in the Japanese market. Just look how many “shojo” light novels are on Bookwalker – and that’s not even scratching the surface.

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Light Novels in China, South Korea, Taiwan and other East Asian countries

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Pictured: 1/2 Prince by Yu Wo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I will be the first to admit that I don’t know a lot about this subject. I can’t read a word of Chinese or Korean and I’ve never stepped foot in China, Korea or Taiwan (although I would certainly love to one day!). Still, light novels interest me greatly, because I think they offer a great way of thinking about how digital publishing has influenced literature around the world.

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